1-25 of 32 items
The Violent Season by Sara Walters
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“The Violent Season” offers a story with some sense of suspense and mystery as it tries to bring you into Wolf Ridge, Vermont and its dangerous month. Th...Show more “The Violent Season” offers a story with some sense of suspense and mystery as it tries to bring you into Wolf Ridge, Vermont and its dangerous month. The book showcases a town that has been plagued with violence every November, driving those with a thirst to kill… The story involves Wyatt Green as she lives in Wolf Ridge, a town that can drive those to kill every November, affecting her longtime friend Cash. Wyatt must piece together the town’s past to find the culprit of her mother’s death last November. I’d say the thing it’s pretty mixed in balance is the character development. Some characters get more time to shine while others don't. I couldn't care for characters like the sheriff or Quinn due to their lack of presence in a book that uses personal connections and people as a major aspect of it. They come across as a bit 1 dimensional or just uninteresting compared to some other characters with their personality and motives and such. What I do like that is present in the book is the looming sense of mystery and probably a bit of dread too. This book is about a town where people would go hostile during November out of nowhere, so it gives some intrigue. I also just like how quiet it is where a death could be known there. I’d give it 3.5/5 stars, nothing felt like filler in my opinion and the way it show’s Cash’s descent into madness was quite intriguing but some characters were’ just not that interesting. Teens getting into murder mysteries or just mysteries would like it. -Reviewed by JB for Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
Never Going Back by Sam Wiebe
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Never Going Back is a fast-paced book about a thief named Alison Kidd. After getting out of prison, she decides she wants to change for the better and qui...Show more Never Going Back is a fast-paced book about a thief named Alison Kidd. After getting out of prison, she decides she wants to change for the better and quit her criminal ways. Alison Kidd has some skeletons in her closet. Before she went to prison, she was a professional thief working for a con artist named Lisa Wan. Now, due to his enormous gambling debts, her brother, Dean, is being used as leverage by Lisa Wan to get Alison back in the business. Alison is conflicted on whether she should return to her old ways to save her brother, or to seek help from the police, but possibly endanger her brother in the process. I liked how the book manages to weave the plot together in a limited number of pages. It is very fast-paced and action-packed but does not neglect any details. However, I didn’t like how condensed the book was. I would enjoy the book more if it had more pages, and if it went more in-depth into Alison Kidd’s past. I would also like to see some more robberies take place, because those are the best scenes in the book, though they are few and far between. The book presented the plot well, despite the short number of pages it had to work with. The plot was clear, concise, and easy to follow throughout the book. I wish the book was longer so we could see more developments in the plot and the characters, because they are a bit basic. Readers who like crime fiction and short reads will enjoy reading this book. I rate this book as a 3 out of 5 stars. -Reviewed by Andrew for Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
Where There's a Whisk by Sarah J Schmitt
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This story was really good! I enjoyed it a lot and read it all in one sitting. So far, this was definitely the best book that I have read out of all of th...Show more This story was really good! I enjoyed it a lot and read it all in one sitting. So far, this was definitely the best book that I have read out of all of the teen book review books that I have read so far. It has a niche topic and was quite an interesting read. I love this book!!! Peyton Sinclaire is a small-town girl who loves cooking. However, she also has a lot of secrets from her past that she is unhappy and ashamed about. When a once in a lifetime opportunity comes, she doesn't hesitate to join “Top Teen Chef”, a new reality cooking competition, in the hopes of gaining a scholarship to a prestigious culinary institute in New York City. However, she quickly gets stereotyped, and comes to the realization that not everything on reality TV is actually truly real. Amidst drama between boys and friendships, Peyton has to prove that she has what it takes to win the competition. What I liked about this book was that it was very realistic in certain areas. For example, the main character didn't start off the competition by being the best in everything. Instead, she ended up losing at least once, and getting negative reviews from the judges. However, what I disliked about this book was that the romance developed horribly, and there was very little chemistry. For example, Peyton and her first love interest(who is named Hakulani) only had a couple lighthearted conversations before the two almost kissed, and she claimed to like him so much, even though they had just met. Her secondary romance with Paulie was just suddenly thrown in, and the two didn't even have that many scenes together. In conclusion, the romance in this book was just awkward and immature. The book did a very good job of describing the food in the story. I could almost perfectly imagine what all of the food looked like in my head. However, I felt that the book lacked logic sometimes. The main reason for this revolves around the reality show concept. I felt that the main character was a little too naive and didn't really understand how shows are supposed to work. I think that young teens will probably like this book the most. It is suitable for every age range, but young teens will probably find this the most exciting. My rating out of 5 would be a 4. -Reviewed by Ashley for Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
We Are Not Broken by George M. Johnson
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Readers will laugh at times, and will definitely cry at times, this is a very heart-felt book and shows the struggles of a young African- American boy who...Show more Readers will laugh at times, and will definitely cry at times, this is a very heart-felt book and shows the struggles of a young African- American boy who just wants to have fun with his cousins and of course his Nanny, as they read George M. Johnson’s book: “We Are Not Broken.” Despite Matt’s encounters with racism, homophobia, and stereotypes, he has his Nanny, his brother Garrett, and his cousins Rall and Rasul to support each other, even through the crazy, wild adventures they conquer together. I liked that each character in the book had their own personality and character, and that there were flashbacks between Matt’s previous experiences, so it kept you interested in what will happen next. George M. included some light, humorous moments in this book but also some heavy, serious moments to keep you wondering what will happen next. There was a lot of foreshadowing used in this book such as at the end when a significant figure is no longer with them, the main plot of this book is just reading along with a young African- American boy’s childhood filled with laughter, adventures, and even struggles. Readers that like heart-felt, emotion packed books, I would definitely recommend this book to you. Matt faces stereotypes, racism, and homophobia throughout his life, but he still has his brothers and are strong together but most important of all, they are not broken. Highly recommend this book ages 14-17. I rate this book a 4/5. -Reviewed by Reva for Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
The Last Time I Saw Her by Alexandra Harrington
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This is a book that I recommend people to read! The story between these two ‘best friends’ is really interesting and I, personally, got hooked to the book...Show more This is a book that I recommend people to read! The story between these two ‘best friends’ is really interesting and I, personally, got hooked to the book from the start. There’s a lot of ‘drama’ that goes on throughout the book, but I really enjoyed it. I honestly feel like at some points of the book, there’s enough to almost too much detail about the ‘scene’/setting. I thought that maybe the details that were already given shouldn’t have been extended because I almost lost track of what had happened before and then I would have to read the whole/previous page all over again. Other than that, I think this book was well-written and intriguing. -Reviewed by Gurleen for Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
Where There's a Whisk by Sarah J. Schmitt
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Sometimes to achieve what people want, they have to go to extreme measures and be cautious of everything around them. Peyton, a small-town girl with love ...Show more Sometimes to achieve what people want, they have to go to extreme measures and be cautious of everything around them. Peyton, a small-town girl with love for baking and a dream to attend American Culinary Institute, has to compete in a reality tv cooking competition to earn a scholarship to attend the school but the ‘reality tv’ may not be as real as it seems. Her encounters with the setups and secrets behind the scenes push her to the limits and test her skills. I had no idea what to expect but this book showcases a variety of settings and emotions. I like fast paced books, and this is one of those books that doesn’t let you linger around in one setting for long. The settings change and blend so well that you always want to know what happens next. The story isn’t merely just about a competition but a journey of dreams and ambitions. The challenges faced by characters lead to them doing better in future. This book is based on a cooking competition but does give an insight to how the industries function. It explains how a normal person can be trapped in a web, controlled from behind the scenes of what is being shown. This book is perfect for readers who get into reading slump a lot. This will not let you think about one set for long 4/5. -Reviewed by Gurleen for Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
The Ghosts We Keep
Book - 2021
All copies in use. Availability details Holds: 1 on 3 copies
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Jay's Gay Agenda
Book - 2021
The Great Destroyers | Scholastic Canada
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The Great Destroyers by Caroline Tung Richmond will draw readers in with every chapter, as the book makes sure that there is constant suspense within the ...Show more The Great Destroyers by Caroline Tung Richmond will draw readers in with every chapter, as the book makes sure that there is constant suspense within the story, captivating the audience with each page they go through. In an alternate world where the nuclear bomb was never invented and wars were settled with the brawl of mechanical fighters, Josephine Linden was born into the era of the cold war, where international rivalries between countries are fought at the Pax Games: a tournament occurring every 4 years that set young fighters of differing origins and countries to fight each other. As an unknown fighter of half-Chinese descent, Josephine Linden struggles to get recognition due to the discrimination she would face against her race and gender at the time, and has to resort to fighting in illegal matches to make enough money to get by. That is, until a senator recognizes Josephine’s will and takes her in to replace an injured fighter for Team USA, giving her a shot at winning the World Championship title. I liked the turbulence of the plot, as you could never be certain what would happen, such as when the Russian fighters were constantly being painted as the main antagonists, scheming to harm the fighters in the games, but when in reality, the culprit was someone that was much less expected. The book has many fitting qualities, such as when Josephine was introduced to the other fighter on Team USA, Sam Kealey, they were practically polar opposites, with Sam’s privileged background contrasting to Josephine’s disadvantaged background. Despite their differences, they get along well and play important roles in each other’s success. It is also inspiring how regardless of Josephine being discriminated against due to her race and gender, she still managed to win the popular opinion of the public in the end, and earned a lot of respect for people with similar situations. Many teens will enjoy the book and setting that it places the characters in, as Josephine battles against not only her opponents at the Pax Games, but also against the stereotypes that surround someone like her. 5/5 Reviewed by Max for Surrey Libraries Teen Book Review Show less
XOXO
Book - 2021
All copies in use. Availability details Holds: 11 on 5 copies
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Pickpocket
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The reader will feel the emotions coursing through Jean-Luc’s mind as he tries to solve a mystery and work at a restaurant at the same time. Jean-Luc want...Show more The reader will feel the emotions coursing through Jean-Luc’s mind as he tries to solve a mystery and work at a restaurant at the same time. Jean-Luc wants nothing more than to help other people out of desperate situations, especially after his own sister, Lena, died from leukemia. The story starts with Jean-Luc waking up in puke to see his friends and discovers that the house is trashed. Jean-Luc’s mother sends him away to Old Nice, France, where he works in a restaurant that makes a food called socca. After his first day, he runs into a girl called Selina who is forced to pickpocket people for her boss, who is only known by the name of Le Patron. Jean-Luc and the restaurant’s employees try to figure a way to save Selina from Le Patron’s slavery. I like that we only got to see what Jean-Luc sees from his own eyes while maintaining the third-person point of view. It is an interesting way to write a story and creates suspense because you only know what Jean-Luc knows. Karen bases the story off of a real-life experience visiting the actual place mentioned in the story. The themes mentioned in this book are close to what most people would want to do when they are put in Jean-Luc’s position. This book uses simple yet detailed language to paint vivid pictures in readers’ minds. Most teens will find this book interesting. The unique setting and writing style Karen uses will appeal to many audiences. This is recommended for ages 14-16. 4/5 Reviewed by Kenny for Surrey Libraries Teen Book Review Show less
Closer to Nowhere
Book - 2020
Great Destroyers
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Packed with action and suspense, The Great Destroyers is an all-rounding book that will have you on the edge of your seat. Filled with twists and turns, r...Show more Packed with action and suspense, The Great Destroyers is an all-rounding book that will have you on the edge of your seat. Filled with twists and turns, readers will enjoy reading Caroline Tung Richmond’s latest novel. Josephine Linden, Jo, is a fighter, and she’s been fighting ever since her mother passed away. Her father being an ex-mecha soldier, she knows everything about the fighting machines and exactly how to win in the ring. When she suddenly gets called to represent Team USA in the international Pax Games, which puts teenage mecha pilots against each other, it’s like a dream come true. Once the games begin though, she realizes that there’s far more depending on this year’s competition than she thought. I really liked the overall plot and suspense it carried throughout the book. The way Richmond wrote about the mecha fights and how they felt was also very interesting to read. There’s nothing to dislike about this book, though I did think that the time spent at the Games could’ve been longer. Jo’s journey from being a rookie to going to the Pax Games and being a finalist will keep you reading to know how it’ll end. In this book, even small interactions and/or actions could actually be part of something bigger, and the way Richmond pulls everything together in the end will have you hoping for a sequel. Teens who like a mix of action and suspense will surely love this book, though there are other genres included. This book is definitely recommended for teens 14 to 18. 5/5 -Fleetwood Teen Show less
Unpopular Vote by Jasper Sanchez
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Overall, this book is well written with a unique and captivating plot. It features diverse characters with varying personalities, making this novel easily...Show more Overall, this book is well written with a unique and captivating plot. It features diverse characters with varying personalities, making this novel easily relatable on some level. Here is a summary of the plot; High school senior Mark Adams feels a responsibility to run for student body president when his friend Benji is treated with awful and unjust actions simply for being queer. Taking after his congressman father, he runs for this governmental position aiming to represent all students. This proves difficult when he plays the illusion of a wealthy, white kid who has everything he needs. Through homophobia, a silencing father and 2 intimidating candidates, Mark learns more about himself, his friends and what really matters. I liked that this book was so interesting in that you got to read from a very uncommon perspective found in literature. I found that this book also covered topics (such as politics) with very opinionated writing, making sense as this is written in first person. A downside to this book is that it uses a fair bit of foul language and goes into details about topics like substance use and sexual matters. And with that being said not all facts are presented in this book, so I encourage readers to do their own research before making an opinion on controversial issues mentioned in this novel. In general, I would say that this book should be for high school readers and above for some inappropriate subject matter (as mentioned in the previous paragraph) Please note there is the use of many homophobic slurs and other offending content so make sure you are comfortable with this language being used (and please don’t use it yourself) Finally, I rate this book (with 5 being the best and 1 being the worst) 4 stars ★★★★ - Fleetwood Teen Show less
The Bitterwine Oath
Book - 2020
The Monarchs by Kass Morgan
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The Monarchs was a sequel to the Ravens, a book I had never read before. I managed to understand what had happened in the last book because of the differe...Show more The Monarchs was a sequel to the Ravens, a book I had never read before. I managed to understand what had happened in the last book because of the different hints or scenes that provided information about the first book, The Ravens. The Monarchs was a very well-written book by Morgan Paige that expressed many different emotions at once. The witches of Kappa lost their magic to a demon who stole it. He acted like one of them to open the gate that could let his demon sisters and brothers out. It shows how Scarlet wins her fellow sisters' trust and builds back Kappa even after her best friends, Tiffany, and Minnie, who was like a second mother to her, passed away. My favourite part was how well the book was written. I also loved the two main characters and how their points of perspective were viewed in each chapter. Personally, I preferred Scarlet better because she was courageous and always supported her sisters in any situation. She overcame many challenges throughout her life but managed to go through them all. I don't have any suggestions to make this book better because it was good. This book would be liked by readers who enjoy fantasy, betrayal, action-packed, and romantic content. Overall, I would give this book a 4/5 because it is adventurous and delightful to read with a beautiful storyline.珞 It is also a good book that teens should consider reading because you don't have to read the first book to understand the second. -Reviewed by Gurseerat for Surrey Libraries' Teen Book Review Show less
The Great Destroyers by Caroline Tung Richmond
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The Great Destroyers was an outstanding book. It was about a girl who lost her mother when she was young and doesn't have money to pay off her rent. She l...Show more The Great Destroyers was an outstanding book. It was about a girl who lost her mother when she was young and doesn't have money to pay off her rent. She lives with her father and brother when she gets selected to represent the USA. She has to play alongside Sam, who beat her twice in the past. She begins to play but soon is in the middle of chaos when many fighters start to die. This book also shows gender inequality and how being a different race can affect your life. Josephine's mother was Chinese and she played in The Pax Games as a girl. For these reasons she was bothered by journalists. She overcame many challenges and showed courage throughout her journey, but it all worked out in the end and she even got selected to play in the championships in Mexico. My favourite part of this book was how the writer wrote about how being a girl affected Josephine's life. I loved how the main character proved everyone wrong and showed her true potential. I don't have any tips for this book to be better because it was written very well. I would like to say that the writer gave a lot of thought when writing 'The Great Destroyers'. This book would be preferred by teens that like action-packed and mystery content. It would also be preferred by readers that like reading about gender inequality and how being a certain race can affect someone, since this book touches on many sensitive topics. Overall, I would give this book a 5/5 because it was awesome and fun to read!! -Reviewed by Gurseerat for Surrey Libraries' Teen Book Review Show less
The Last Time I Saw Her by Alexandra Harrington
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“The Last Time I Saw Her” is a small-town mystery novel with pinches of romance and intrigue that keeps the reader hooked from start to finish. Charlotte ...Show more “The Last Time I Saw Her” is a small-town mystery novel with pinches of romance and intrigue that keeps the reader hooked from start to finish. Charlotte Romer returns to her hometown, River John, Nova Scotia after a year away. In leaving, she left her brother, school, and her best friend, right after a traumatic event. Guilt riddles through her when she thinks about the accident that left Sophie Thompson paralyzed. Upon returning, she faces her culpability from going from her town to a boarding school, right after the accident, and to make it worse, she didn’t tell anybody. Sophie is mad, enraged, with her old best friend. She had lost everything, her parents alliance, her feeling in her legs, and of course, Charlotte. Charlotte faces her brother who had lost control. Crime is no stranger to her brother Sean; he was involved in drug dealings. Though the last thing he wanted was for his sister to get involved. That’s exactly what happened. Charlotte rekindles her relationships with her old friends who help her navigate what’s ahead. Throughout the book I enjoyed the character development and plot deepening through the details that the author included. The book tied together well and there was descriptive wording. Although, the book had a slow start and it took me a couple chapters to get into it but after the initial chapters, I was hooked. This book being set in Canada provided it with imagery that described the setting well. The feelings that the descriptive words gave helped set the theme. The book presented two internal conflicts, person vs person and person vs self, these conflicts clashing gave the protagonist depth. Any reader who is interested in small town mystery is who this book is for. I give this book 4 stars. -Reviewed by Ruth-Anne for Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
The Great Destroyers by Caroline Tung Richmond
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I found this book to be a very thrilling and exciting book and it had me hooked all the way to the end. I loved all the drama and action in it as well as ...Show more I found this book to be a very thrilling and exciting book and it had me hooked all the way to the end. I loved all the drama and action in it as well as the real world connection I could make while reading it! In this book during the World War 1 Germany developed a Mecha robot that can carry soldiers and son the whole world was following but after the wars these robots were used in competitions in which Jo linden participated in but unexpectedly a contestant named Rushi was discovered for sabotaging and poisoning other players and this was all to ruin a trade deal between USA and Vietnam. It was a good addition to the book of how the author described the battles so well and the feelings Jo was having before, after and during it and it really added to the action theme of the novel. I like how the author also touched some subjects in real life like the discrimination against Chinese Americans. I also enjoyed the plot twist at the end when Jo figured it out it was Rushi who poisoned everybody and not Lidiya. One thing that could have made this book a little better is maybe a little more complex plot because in this it was really very simple and straightforward which was also good in a way but if you added a little more complexity into it I think it would have increased the depth of the book a lot. The book described Jo's family situation really well because throughout the book Jo kept on mentioning her motivation to continue and listen to coach Malcolm which was for the sponsors so she could get money that could take their family out of poverty and that shows just how much Jo is willing to do to help her family and how strong their bonds are so much that she is willing to jeopardize her shot at winning the games. Once I got everything at the end of the book it made a lot of sense because Jo explained before that the world now runs on Etherium and the fact that China is willing to start World War 3 for it isn't that surprising because even the real world multiple wars have started because of oil in the middle east. This book is an excellent choice for readers who enjoy suspense, action, and competitive style books. I would rate this book a 4.5 out of 5 – Review by Nonit Show less
Hey Jude by Star Spider
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In my personal experience hey Jude by Star Spider is an amazing book for teens. Hey Jude explores LGBTQIA+, mental illness issues, family, suicide, and ro...Show more In my personal experience hey Jude by Star Spider is an amazing book for teens. Hey Jude explores LGBTQIA+, mental illness issues, family, suicide, and romance all in one book. One normal teen Penny Lane has to take care of her little sister Jude, keep up her grades so she can get scholarships, and have a job at Java World to help out her family. Her dad passed away and left her mom to take care of his debts. Her little sister is Jude clinically depressed and has crashed before. She is afraid Jude will overdose again. She soon falls in love with the new kid Jack who then supports her with her little sister because he knows how it feels to be in Jude’s shoes. Overall, I really liked the book; it was a very good read. I liked how it explored different genres. When you read the book, it feels like it is going so in depth and sometimes it feels like you are really there. I think there was some irony when Penny Lane said she could never ever fit romance in her life because of Jude but then immediately found Jack, it was like an instant love connection. I think there was some humour in there, when Penny Lane confessed she makes horrible pancakes and she was jealous of his little sister because Jude made amazing pancakes. I think the type of readers for this book are from ages 12 to 18. If I had to give this a rating out of 5, 5 being the best, then I would give it a 5. -Reviewed by Priya for Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
Heart Sister by Michael F Stewart
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Overall, I really enjoyed the book, and it had a really sad, bittersweet vibe to it. It had a very unique plotline, and the story had ties to the author’s...Show more Overall, I really enjoyed the book, and it had a really sad, bittersweet vibe to it. It had a very unique plotline, and the story had ties to the author’s own life. The book is basically about how this guy lost his twin sister in a car accident, and how his twin had signed up to be an organ donor right before her death. After she dies, her organs are donated to people in need of organ transplants, and he tries to find them. His parents are both super depressed (especially his mom), so he decides to make a film about the organ transplants people's new lives with their new organs. He wanted to show his parents how his twin sister had positively impacted other people, even after her death. I liked how the story plot was unique, and how realistic it was. The fact that not every donor recipient was the nicest person really seemed realistic. However, I disliked how at certain times, it was really confusing. For example, the virtual reality descriptions were incredibly confusing. I had no idea how the VR headset worked. The scenes around the campfire were incredibly boring and confusing. The book was really good at showing character growth. Pretty much all of the character’s had a redeeming arc, and displayed progression and improvements in their lifestyles, personalities, etc. For example, the heart recipient was hostile and cold at first, but later opened up and became warm. Likewise, the kidney recipient was racist, but later accepted the fact that all races/ethnicities are equal. I think that young adults will enjoy this kind of book the most. The vocabulary of this book is quite advanced, so it is more suitable for older kids. Also, people who love reading sad stories. (Even though it has a happy ending). My rating is 3 out of 5. -Reviewed by Ashley for Surrey Libraries' Teen Book Review Show less
Violent Season
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“The Violent Season” by Sara Walters was a book full of suspense and had tons of detail. The pacing of the book was good and the writing was able to draw ...Show more “The Violent Season” by Sara Walters was a book full of suspense and had tons of detail. The pacing of the book was good and the writing was able to draw me in to keep me reading. Along with that, the plot was not predictable. “The Violent Season” takes place in November in a small town called Wolf Ridge. This time of the year was when violence erupted. After countless deaths taking place, including Wyatt Green’s mother who died last November, she is convinced there is a sickness that is infecting the people of Wolf Ridge. She now fears that the sickness has infected her best friend Cash. However, the truth of her mother’s death, her best friend, and the people she thought she knew, slowly unravels as the deadly month continues. I liked the book’s detail in its writing. It was written with great imagery that allowed me to picture the settings and the characters in my head and feel the suspenseful atmosphere. The novel presented the conflict with metaphors which I thought was a great technique. It was good because I understood and followed the conflicts and emotions that the characters were experiencing well. The dark and mysterious setting of Wolf Ridge set the mood and atmosphere, which let me feel the suspense and tension of the plot, almost as if I was experiencing the emotions and conflicts happening in the book. Readers who are interested in suspense, thrillers, crime, and love to solve mysteries would most likely enjoy this book. I give this book a rating of four out of five. Review by: Riza for Surrey Libraries Teen Book Review Show less
The Great Destroyers by Caroline Tung Richmond
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Readers will be engaged and interested in this book because it explores the world where wars are won with giant mechanical soldiers. The book is thrilling...Show more Readers will be engaged and interested in this book because it explores the world where wars are won with giant mechanical soldiers. The book is thrilling because people fight in Pax Games that are deadly and violent. Jo Linden lives in a world where robot fighting is brought into the Cold war. She is a teenager who is trying hard to keep her family in place. She and her father do whatever they can to earn money to keep a roof over their heads. Jo is a skilled mecha fighter, but her gender holds her back from competing legally. Then her life changes when the new female senator recruits her to be on the US mecha fighting team in the Pax Games. Later, as she enters the game, she realizes there is more going on behind the scenes than she realized. She is drawn into a deadly political plot, and she is soon caught up in it. I liked how the author based the story on the Cold war and how it parallels the history we know. I liked how the historical context was brought to life in a fresh way in this book and how it included the theme of sexism and racism. There were many parts where the author used imagery. Due to this, I was more engaged with the story, and it felt more realistic. The characters action was written in detail, thus, it helped me with creating images and picturing it. Also, the conflict of the story kept me reading because I wanted to see what will happen in the end. I think other teens will enjoy this book because it is amusing. Most teens will feel thrilled with the character’s experience and will be fascinated with the new world the protagonist is living in. 4/5. -Reviewed by Anonymous for Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
Marilla Before Anne by Louise Michalos
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Marilla Before Anne was an eye-opening book that offered a unique perspective on the life of Marilla Cuthbert, who once was a happy, naive, girl, but is n...Show more Marilla Before Anne was an eye-opening book that offered a unique perspective on the life of Marilla Cuthbert, who once was a happy, naive, girl, but is now a stern lady. Marilla Cuthbert, a bright and energetic seventeen-year-old, is in love with William, her sweetheart. However, her mom is strongly opposed to this relationship, wanting her to marry another man instead. After William leaves for an apprenticeship, Marilla discovers that she is pregnant. What will happen to Marilla, William, and their baby? I liked how Marilla gradually began to understand her cold and mean mother. Her mother loved her father, but he did not love her back. As Marilla continues through her many hardships, she becomes very similar to her late mother, and is empathetic. As much as I disliked all the unfortunate things that this book is full of, it is a representation of reality for many people. It shows that life is not always glitter and unicorns. This book would be suited for people that enjoy historical fiction, and I would give it 3 out of 5 stars. -Reviewed by Vivien for the Surrey Libraries’ Teen Book Review Show less
Homewrecker
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Home Wrecker by Deanna Cameron starts with the main character Bronwyn waiting for her mother to pick her up from school. Late as usual, she decides to wal...Show more Home Wrecker by Deanna Cameron starts with the main character Bronwyn waiting for her mother to pick her up from school. Late as usual, she decides to walk home and is met with a tornado heading straight for their trailer. Bronwyn luckily makes it out in time, however her mother does not. As a result, Bronwyn is taken in by her father and at his home is where she meets the rest of his family. She experiences an identity crisis and is forced to figure herself out alone after once living a rundown life with her drug addict mother to now living with her father and blending into his family. Bronwyn is also faced with the news that her mother was not actually killed in the disaster, but murdered. Home Wrecker is quite different from the books I usually tend to read; however, I still appreciated the writing. The murder mystery aspect of the plot is what initially interested me, but I was a bit disappointed by the lack of development and lack of thriller there actually was throughout the book. I think if there was more complexity and anticipation added to the death of Bronwyn’s mother, this book could have been more enjoyable for me. Personally, a lot of the events in this story were predictable and therefore I did no longer feel intrigued by the end of the book. I did like though how the main character in this book was presented with an identity issue I'm sure a lot of teenagers can or have related to which is the two lifestyles of separated parents. I would rate this book a 3/5 and would recommend it to someone who enjoys themes of identity in writing. Fleetwood Teen Show less
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