Murder of A Lady

Murder of A Lady

A Scottish Mystery

eBook - 2016
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Duchlan Castle is a gloomy, forbidding place in the Scottish Highlands. Late one night the body of Mary Gregor, sister of the laird of Duchlan, is found in the castle. She has been stabbed to death in her bedroom--but the room is locked from within and the windows are barred. The only tiny clue to the culprit is a silver fish's scale, left on the floor next to Mary's body.Inspector Dundas is dispatched to Duchlan to investigate the case. The Gregor family and their servants are quick--perhaps too quick--to explain that Mary was a kind and charitable woman. Dundas uncovers a more complex truth, and the cruel character of the dead woman continues to pervade the house after her death. Soon further deaths, equally impossible, occur, and the atmosphere grows ever darker. Superstitious locals believe that fish creatures from the nearby waters are responsible; but luckily for Inspector Dundas, the gifted amateur sleuth Eustace Hailey is on the scene, and unravels a...
Publisher: 2016
ISBN: 9781464205729
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Additional Contributors: OverDrive, Inc

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WhidbeyIslander
Aug 03, 2017

Nicely written and set in a manor house in the Scottish Highlands, I enjoyed reading this, although it could have been a wee shorter. Some of the characters act in a strange manner, put down to the particular characteristics of the Highland people. The solution to the murder(s) is a bit farfetched, sort of hinging on fantastical luck on the part of the killer. (If you've read a number of locked room murder novels, you've probably come across characters poo-poohing this method of killing.) The family makes the Macbeths look like a normal country group. Fun to read nevertheless.

NOTE: The review by 1_Great_Book outlines the method of the murder, and should have had a SPOILER Warning attached.

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1_Great_Book
Jun 27, 2017

Slightly pedantic, old fashioned phrasing, repetitive exposes at thinking through clues with one added piece of information at a time.....while I have appreciated rereading some older novels recently resuscitated from dusty archives for their historical value, the only point of reading Wynne would be for the historical study of the evolution of the detective novel, as he seemed to specialize in exposing an impossible crime committed beyond locked doors and bolted windows.

But really, a block of ice (even after refrigerators were invented) thrown out a window that shatters and drives jagged spikes through a chest as someone leans out a window, that then melts and leaves no trace? And we learn this after hearing only a dozen other fabricated scenarios of accusation by self satisfied police? I won't be wasting any more of my time with Wynne of the 1930's.

This is stilted, to put it politely.

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