Climate of Extremes

Climate of Extremes

Global Warming Science They Don't Want You to Know

Book - 2009
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Is the weather truly getting worse? When it comes to global warming, dire predictions seem to be all we see or hear. Climatologists Patrick Michaels and Robert Balling Jr. explain why the news and information we receive about global warming have become so apocalyptic. The science itself has become increasingly biased, with warnings of extreme consequences from global warming becoming the norm. That bias is then communicated through the media, who focus on only extreme predictions. The authors compellingly illuminate the other side of the story, the science we aren't being told. This body of work details how the impact of global warming is far less severe than is generally believed and far from catastrophic.
Publisher: Washington, DC : Cato Inst c2009
Edition: 1st pbk. ed
ISBN: 9781935308171
9781933995236
1933995238
Branch Call Number: 363.73874 MIC 2009
Characteristics: xiii, 267 p., [26] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 23 cm
Additional Contributors: Balling, Robert C.

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Robertshallcross
Jun 11, 2015

Pat Michaels is a fossil fuel professional.

Example? Cato Institute (right wing think tank) fellow and editor of the "World Climate Report" received $100K from the Intermountain Rural Electric Association, a Colorado fossil fuels cooperative.

In Feb. 2009, Michaels swore before the Congressional House Energy and Commerce Committee that only 3% of his $4.2 million in financial support came from the oil and gas industry.

Yet, on Aug. 15th, 2010, Pat Michaels said during a CNN interview:

ZAKARIA: “Can I ask you what percentage of your work is funded by the petroleum industry?”

MICHAELS: “I don’t know. 40 percent? I don’t know.”

http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2010/08/16/113717/oil-fueled-pat-michaels/

“Michaels also receives direct funding from the Koch brothers, who from their base in Wichita, Kansas, control the largest privately held oil company in the US. They've gained political notoriety for bankrollin­g Tea Party candidates through an umbrella of dozens of "non-profit" organizations, such as Americans for Prosperity.

And, for years the Kochs have funneled money to organisations that oppose government regulations and deny the existence of climate change.”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/jan/25/michaels-climate-sceptic-misled-congress.

n
naturalist
Jun 11, 2015

“Patrick Michaels : Cato’s climate expert has history of getting it wrong.” July 13, 2013, from: http://www.skepticalscience.com/patrick-michaels-history-getting-climate-wrong.html . . . . . and “Patrick J. Michaels . . . is a largely oil-funded global warming skeptic . . . “ from http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/Patrick_J._Michaels . . . . . Funding controversy[edit]

Balling was mentioned as a fossil fuel industry – funded scientist in Ross Gelbspan's 1997 book The Heat is On. This led the Minnesota Star Tribune to run an editorial speaking of a "disinformation campaign" by some climatologists. Balling and his colleague Patrick Michaels took a complaint against the Star Tribune to the Minnesota News Council. By a 9–4 decision the council "voted to sustain the complaint that the Star Tribune editorial unfairly characterized the scientific reputations of Patrick Michaels and Robert Balling."[12] At the 1998 hearing, Balling "acknowledged that he had received $408,000 in research funding from the fossil fuel industry over the last decade (of which his University takes 50% for overhead)."[12]

Between December 1998[13] and September 2001[14] Balling was listed as a "Scientific Adviser" to the Greening Earth Society, a group that was funded and controlled by the Western Fuels Association (WFA), an association of coal-burning utility companies. WFA founded the group in 1997, according to an archived version of its website, "as a vehicle for advocacy on climate change, the environmental impact of CO2, and fossil fuel use."[15] In 2001, while it was directed by Balling, ASU's office of climatology received $49,000 from ExxonMobil.[16]

From 1989 to 2002, Balling received more than $679,000 from fossil-fuel-industry organizations; however, as of 2007, he had also received more than $7 million in research funding from the National Science Foundation and the EPA.[17] He has also come under scrutiny because he was listed as a tentative author of the Heartland Institute's NIPCC report; however, ASU's vice president of public affairs, Virgil Renzulli, argued that this did not prove that Balling had been receiving money from Heartland. Balling himself added that his prior involvement with the Heartland Institute's activities amounted only to appearing at a luncheon they held in 2008.[18]

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